AndrewF

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AndrewF last won the day on June 14 2018

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  1. wow. 4. most doctors never see a case of ALS!
  2. Good for you for getting scoped! So many times you hear of diseases people get and they go on and on and on with symptoms and dont push for more diagnostic work. There's a fine line about being aware of your body, and also not being unnecessarily anxious. Also, late 30s....is a good time to start making sure you have enough fiber in your diet. Colon health and avoiding "hemi"s. I (41) use a little supplement with my coffee. Talk over with your doctor.
  3. Mick Jagger needs acute heart valve replacement. Like, tomorrow. Alex Trebek has cancer of the pancreas. Ted Turner has lewy body dimentia. Others just....gone. No warning. Heart attack, car crash, anvil falls, truck tire comes detached. I mean, anything. ______________ hey, fill in the blank. You have to guard your mind some, and make sure you enjoy each and every day. Because.....spending time worrying what illness "you might get"....you might not even be so lucky. Falling piano, escaped chimpanzee, exotic snake bite, etc etc etc. 😕
  4. Well, they dont want to insure someone who is a guaranteed loss, right??
  5. Notice the frequent use of "feel" or "feeling".... A great rule of thumb is that ALS is a disease of FAILING, not "feeling." You cant walk. You can't pick something up. Some limb just doesnt function. Even then, it takes quite a while to get to the bottom of it, because it is RARE and it is a diagnosis of excusion, after everything else has been ruled out. It amazes me why people go right to it. Its a media-friendly disease, and if it bleeds it leads. Lou Gehrig, Stephen Hawking, football players, etc etc etc.
  6. When my wife was pregnant with our twins, I developed all sorts of stuff. Stomach issues, to the point I insisted on a scope. "Couvade syndrome" is the only explanation. Nothing like a sick child to drive up the anxiety, especially if its a recurring chronic thing. My little ones were 4lb each, born at 32 weeks, and spent 2 weeks in NICU, I imagine you had a much longer time there. Its nothing short of miraculous what they can do these days. My older daugher needed open heart surgery at 6 months old (and was fixed). That whole evolution was quite something. All that said.....guidance is now age 45 for a colonoscope if you have no higher risk factors. So get that when its time. Also, it takes time for your body to "come down" from anxiety. It doesnt just go away overnight.
  7. I would go and insist on a scope. You need to know if you have GERD for sure, or any other conditions warranting treatment. Yes, people in their 30s have gotten gastric cancer....but far, far, farrrrr less than die in car crashes for instance. Now, untreated GERD could lead to some nasty diseases, and a scope will help dx those. My wife became like this, and I had her scoped within a month or so of symptoms, she was 43 at the time. I said "lets rule out anything awful" then we can relax and deal with whatever it is. The procedure is a piece of cake. The prep is basically nothing and its done in like 10 minutes.
  8. Thats really great news! Its the kind of result to "bottle up" in a little jar and revisit that feeling when something in life tries to bring you down. My mother in law, about...8 years ago now...had a tumor on her kidney. Vascularized 4cm neoplasm. All the hallmarks of kidney cancer. A needle biopsy (unnecessary actually) was "inconclusive" and basically called it cancer without using that word. And to add to the drama, they CT's her chest and said she had "nodules in her lungs" so they were like, yeah, must be mRCC. Well, the lung nodules were old damage from pneumonia as a child; and after FOUR weeks of gross pathology, including sending it to JHU Hospital, came back and said "not cancer." I learned something really valuable there. Patience. I was reading lots of articles on treatment methodologies for mRCC, journal entries, research. Which, by the way, is even more advanced now. All wasted time. With a kid, things are twice as anxious. When my oldest daugher was 7 months old, she needed open heart surgery. A cath procedure failed to fix her valve problem. So we had to go shopping for sugeons. It hard to hand over a perfectly healthy kid just because "well, when she gets to be a teenager, this will start to dramatically impact her life." I read books on heart disease, history, surgery. Made a choice for a surgeon, and moved ahead. We had a good result, durable to this day. Congrats on your successful surgery and good results!
  9. Obesity is in fact the biggest health risk facing young people. Poor diet and lifestyle are actually raising the rates of these types of diseases in younger people while they fall in older people. Once you get this resolved, and it doesnt sound life threatening, or your doctor would have sent you for more workups, you need to get your BMI back to healthy range. You can get away with a lot up to maybe 30 or 35 and then it starts to really impact your health. Setting aside longevity as a concern, just current quality of life is worth doing it for. Longevity is a bonus.
  10. So, another useful anecdote. My wife had one of these too. Doc did an excision. Gone. Said it was not melanoma but "pre cancerous, kinda" This was like 14 years ago or something. Your doctor is looking out for you. If it was an acute risk, you wouldn't be waiting until the 21st for the excision. It sounds like the report is insinuating that the biopsy sample didn't havea margin around it, so there are some atypical cells remaining on you, and taking those is in your best interest. Lots, meaning thousands, not millions, of people "get" malignant melanoma every year. Its just removed surgically. You dont even have Stage 0 of this disease yet, you have ....lets say...."stage -1" The people who go on to cultivate this and then die of it are the ones who never go to the doctor and get checked out. You should be feeling the same relief someone feels when they get their colonoscopy and the doc removes some advacned polyps that are pre-cancerous. All of our bodies are ticking time bombs, but the chances are you have a LOT of time left on the countdown clock, so do the surgery and keep moving with a good life!
  11. So, another useful anecdote. My wife had one of these too. Doc did an excision. Gone. Said it was not melanoma but "pre cancerous, kinda" This was like 14 years ago or something. Your doctor is looking out for you. If it was an acute risk, you wouldn't be waiting until the 21st for the excision. It sounds like the report is insinuating that the biopsy sample didn't havea margin around it, so there are some atypical cells remaining on you, and taking those is in your best interest. Lots, meaning thousands, not millions, of people "get" malignant melanoma every year. Its just removed surgically. You dont even have Stage 0 of this disease yet, you have ....lets say...."stage -1" The people who go on to cultivate this and then die of it are the ones who never go to the doctor and get checked out. You should be feeling the same relief someone feels when they get their colonoscopy and the doc removes some advacned polyps that are pre-cancerous. All of our bodies are ticking time bombs, but the chances are you have a LOT of time left on the countdown clock, so do the surgery and keep moving with a good life!
  12. In old people, painless jaundice "should be assumed" to be a disease that rhymes with skanky attic dancer, "and worked up rapidly, until proven otherwise". According to med text books. But we see doctors, not read text books, and you are talking about a young child. I'd say call your pediatrician, then go with what they say and dont ruminate over it!
  13. Yes. Fiber is good for maintaining the subway trains moving smoothly, helps with the hemis. One serving in coffee in the AM is great. I have 3 internal hemis. Grade 2. I want to keep them grade 2 and not 3-4 ! never any blood, but they can cause leakage and "pruritis ani" if irritated. The anoscope...been there. Quite a thing.... Yikes. "Geez doc shouldn't you buy me dinner first?" Jokes aside, being able to frankly discuss these topics, with your doctor or family, is important. Real diseases get ignored because people hesitate about "icky' things. Docs have seen it ALL, you're not gonna shock them, its their job.
  14. Lets look at this with some rationality. Malignant melanoma is a serious disease....when it advances. The people that die from this are the ones who dont pay attention to themselves and dont check for moles and changes to moles and ignore "that freckle that keeps bleeding and wont stop." Now, there's also amelanotic melanoma, uveal melanoma, subungual melanoma, nodular melanoma (all screenable very well) and of course mucosal melanoma (not so easy to find, but you may was well worry more about dying in a car accident, honestly.) My father in law had melaoma on his back about 10-15 years ago. He went to the doctor regularly every 6 or 12 months to get checked. Doc was right away like "whoa whats that?!" when he got to that area. Took a punch biopsy. Called later..... "bad news is its melanoma, good news is its small and shallow and we'll take it out!" Boom, done. Melanoma is like breast cancer in a way. If you go regularly for screening, and help by doing your own "screening," the chances of this laying you low are approaching zero. Now go worry about an abdominal aortic aneurysm!
  15. My aunt, 63 and with no children, had ovarian cancer. That's a much more typical age. She had clotting in her lungs. Anyway, they went in and removed it surgically and that was it. Well, not quite "it", she had like 2 more surgeries just to close up some bleeders that they somehow missed, around her digestive tract. But that was like 5 years ago and they got it all, it was just removed. What I find fascinating is that, if one has a gene mutation, even after removing the organs, you can still get the disease. I still dont understand how that is possible. ?!?!