Bobnnat

Full Member
  • Content Count

    590
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    16

Bobnnat last won the day on November 7 2018

Bobnnat had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

399 Excellent

4 Followers

About Bobnnat

  • Rank
    Snr Member
  • Birthday February 15

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Toronto, formerly Pennsylvania
  • Interests
    anxiety, massive attacks of panic, fear of death...and baseball.

Recent Profile Visitors

1,268 profile views
  1. Bobnnat

    Scary migraine aura

    I get them as well. Starting to get migraines means nothing. It's in no way related to tumors or anything else. Maybe it's genetic, maybe stress build up is being released via a migraine, or maybe there's no obvious reason. It doesn't matter. Yes, the first one scares the hell out of you. If you have another, just go somewhere you can be alone, like a bathroom stall if you're at work, and let the aura come and go. Keep headache meds with you and take them once the aura starts. Might help, might not.
  2. Bobnnat

    Super Nervous About MRI - Anyone had one?

    Hi Matty, its a breeze. They slide you into the MRIs center by a tube, gliding you in there. They give you earplugs and offer you your choice of music. Even with the music and plugs you will hear the machine. It sounds like a jackhammer. Not the most pleasurable sound. The sound lasts as long as the one portion of the imaging is occurring. The operator can communicate with you. If you get scared (you won't) you have a lifeline, just talk. Otherwise, the operator will let you know when each portion is over. She'll give you updates, like ok, only 2 more sections, first is 5 minutes then the last 10 minutes.... you do have to keep still. That's pretty easy since you're in there rather tightly. Have fun! Bob
  3. Bobnnat

    New User / ALS / MND Worries.

    Hi Jordan, Sorry you're suffering like this. I suggest you search ALS on this forum (not Google). You will learn quite a lot. First and foremost, if you've been twitching for 7 months, you don't have it. ALS is a fast moving disease. If it started up on you 7 months ago, by now you'd be in such a condition that it would be obvious to everyone that you are very ill. Much more than twitching. Let's discuss twitching. This site's posts will explain how twitching, if it occurs at all in ALS, occurs AFTER muscle death. So perhaps you're in a wheelchair unable to walk and you might see these fasiculations. They are NOT pre-cursors to worse things to come; rather they are the after effect of dead muscles. Next, age 27. There are about 1-2 people diagnosed per year for each 100,000 people. Plus, the vast majority who are diagnosed are 50+. That puts your odds at like 1-500,000 at least. More chance to be struck twice by lightning in 2 consecutive storms, or to win a lottery. You'd be featured in a JAMA publication if at 27 you were so diagnosed. Anxiety and physical labor can lead to twitching. Even after our anxiety has lessened, the cortisol we built up in our body is still there; it takes months to fully dissipate; so yes, twitching when you don't feel anxious at the moment is common. The testing I'm sure was to allow you peace of mind. It's not a pleasant test, but if you need it to have peace, follow through. Bob
  4. Bobnnat

    Atrophy?

    Cuban, I've been following your posts. I think in large part you are doing what people with HA do so well..overthink. We believe we need to totally understand every little thing our bodies are doing, as if we could image every lump, jerk, twinge of pain and know 100% why. That's what kills us, Cuban, this overthinking. I have my wife to tell me when I'm overthinking and it at least makes me stop and see how deep in the hole I'm allowimg myself to go. One difference I see between you and me is that when my doctor, after carefully listening to all i have to say (which I write down and read to him), and after his exam, and then his diagnosis, and the things he can rule out, I believe him. Sometimes I'll need to go back for another appointment and pretty much repeat myself (likely annoying to him) so I can hear it again and maybe ask another question or two that occurred to me. It doesn't chane his mind and i (usually) move on from my fear. Yes, doctors, specialists and imaging and radiologists who read imaging can make errors; they're only human. But really Cuban, what choice do we have? We need to have a doctor we like, trust and respect and take the leap that she/he will do nothing to hurt us (Hippocratic Oath). then, following their directions, accept their diagnosis and move on. What we feel we need is really to have the docs or ourselves be God-like, and that's impossible. Acceptance is all we have..and faith. Failure to do this gives carte blanche to our anxiety, allowing it to run havoc over our minds and bodies; and we know anxiety will gladly do that..in spades. Don't give anxiety that power, as it will always take it. Bob
  5. So, so true. Imagine someone with money in their hands says to you hey, I have $1,000 here and it's all yours. By the way, I have a machine here to hook up to your brain (perfectly safe) which allow me to read your thoughts. The money is yours, no questions asked IF you can go 10 seconds without thinking of pink elephants. Few of us would collect the money. Our brain just can't help going there! Same with symptoms. Right now I'm dealing with an issue and I'm trying to determine if the pain is staying the same, or improving. I think it's getting better, but if I stop and concentrate on the area in question, damn if I don;t feel the pain, and conclude no, it;s not getting better. But, it's because I'm fixating on it! The mind can be a wonderful thing, but parts of our brains should be locked up and charged with indecent cruelty.
  6. Bobnnat

    PROSTATE reassurance

    Hi Drew, Geezer actually had PC so I fully respect his opinions. However, if your doctor didn't explain it to you, I suggest you do some heavy research into PSA testing. There are good and bad aspects to it. For example, my GP is against them; still, I chose early on to get them and continue to do so. I am scared senseless though on the day I attend for the result, and how it compares to the last time and what the trend is. The upside of PSA testing: Obviously it gives clues that could be PC and catching it before symptoms appear is the best chance for a full cure. The downsides of PSA testing: PSA increases for several reasons beside cancer; BPH which is a common, benign condition where the prostate simply increases in size as you age. It can cause symptoms similar to PC so that's scary. A DRE done by a qualified doctor can tell whether your prostate is enlarged or not and can feel for evidence of cancer (although the DRE's accuracy in identifying cancer is 10-20% only. That's why they do the PSA as well). Also, as you noted, the false positives. You get a reading that is >4,0 and they recommend biopsy. That biopsy isn't guranteed to identify the cancer if its there, since it';s what's called a punch biopsy; a sampling. Also, a reading under 4.0 may not be enough to avoid a biopsy; for example, if the trend in your numbers (after you've had 3 or more) shows rapid increases, or if your doctor believes the number, even though under 4.0 is too high for your age. PSA levels naturally rise with age. At 41, yours should likely be under 2.0 but obviously talk with the doc re that. Another issue has to do with how often you get tested. It used to be yearly if PSA is deemed normal. Research showed that yearly increased the chance for false positives w/no corresponding benefit. Between 2-4 years are I believe the recommended frequency. Finally, and this is important, the vast majority of PC are not dangerous (~90%), and the patient will eventually die with PC and not from it. Now the other say 10% are potentially serious and need to be dealt with. Here's the problem. Say a biopsy shows cancer cells. You get what's called a Gleason score. Say that score is low; your doctor will likely give you the option of watch and wait, but human nature proves that if someone knows they harbor a cancer, even if it's not likely to progress, they want it out. So, many choose to go with removal of the prostate. While that takes the cancer with it, there is a serious risk of ED and/or urinary incontinence. As you can see, I researched the hell out of this, and it has caused me much grief over the years. When my next one comes up in 2020 I know I'll go through the same fear. Guidelines say that the patient needs to have a serious talk w/their physician on the pros and cons of testing, and then it's the patient who decides whether or not to test. Bob
  7. Bobnnat

    ALS Symptoms! HELP!

    "The incidence is defined as the number of new cases per year. Within a population of 100,000 people, there are 2 new ALS cases each year. The average age of people who are diagnosed with ALS is between 55 and 65. The number of new cases of ALS varies with age. For people in their 60’s there are three to four new cases within a population of 100,000 each year. The disease is more common among non-Hispanics and more common in men than women".
  8. Bobnnat

    ALS Symptoms! HELP!

    Twitching is caused primarily by anxiety which you have big time. People complain on this board all the time of twitching and major strong contractions of muscles. Likely some minor nerve related thing coupled with a nasty case of anxiety.
  9. Bobnnat

    ALS Symptoms! HELP!

    There's perceived weakness and clinical weakness. You believing your hand is weak is perceived. Actual weakness is if you're examined and the doctor tells you so. Sounds like with all you can still do, it's not clinical weakness. Even if by chance it were, there are so many minor things that can cause it, like carpal tunnel, and similar nerve entrapment syndroms, pinched nerves and a score more.
  10. Bobnnat

    ALS Symptoms! HELP!

    Have you read any of the multiple posts on this subject over the past few months? There have been a ton. I suggest you read those and the accurate, helpful responses from the board members rather than Google about an anomoly that may not even be true. And if it is, it's 1 in 50,000,000. Spoiler alert: Your symptoms are 100.00% NOT what you fear.
  11. Bobnnat

    Constant terror for my oldest daughter

    You are correct. Either she uses that leg more, unconsciously, or perhaps she feels a normal quick pain, or even pins and needles which she calls pain.
  12. Bobnnat

    Body-wide Muscle Twitching

    Hi JD, Youve had all the testing and expert evaluations to rule out serious problems, yet it appears you haven't treated the diagnosis you did received..anxiety. In 17 months you'd be dead or terribly disabled, so you have to put that thought away. Lots of similar posts over the past few months. Might want to read them instead of Google. Everything that needs to be said to you will be found in those posts. Please invest in therapy, for the sake of your wife and darling baby, if not for yourself. Bob
  13. Bobnnat

    Constant terror for my oldest daughter

    Hi Rebecca, i assume you've tried different types of counselling and medications. I could tell you as a parent of a 7 year old daughter that she complains of leg pain...one leg and has for over a year. Doc says growing pains. But that won't be enough to calm you more than a moment I imagine. Also, you know you're practising "magical thinking". No, you don't have the ability to see the future. You are not able to prognosticate, at least not with any special ability. Finally, if she had something sinister, she'd be complaining of a whole lot more issues. i think you know your feelings are illogical, but they're just intrusive thoughts. CBT or the approach where they teach you to accept your thoughts and let them pass are thoughts. Bob
  14. Bobnnat

    Headache worries

    Hi Abe, Headaches are very rarely the first symptom of a BT. I went through a headache/BT episode this past summer. I'll leave you with this one study I read about. In the U.K. over like a 25 year period, general practitioners kept records. The experts scoured the records to find those who complained of only a headache. There were over 3,500 such entries and a total of 3 ended up having a BT. That's less than 1-1,000. Plus, it's totally possible that those 3 patients in reality had other symptoms that either they didn't mention to the doctor, or the doctor didn't write down. The purpose of the study was to confirm the existing best practices which said GPS shouldn't order imaging when the only symptom is a headache. The practice was confirmed. Interestingly, even with another symptom (other than seizure) the odds didn't increase much at all. Sinus and or tension headaches which may continue until you calm down about it. Bob
  15. Bobnnat

    I Don't Know

    Wow Zanz. That's a lot to take in. Diagnosing yourself via Google is very dangerous. Google doesn't know you, never examined you or tested you. You are not medically trained despite your extensive reading online. Two things to know about Google. They are ad based so it's all about money. Second, they list even the most improbable causes of symptoms, as the siteowners fear they will be sued by that one person in a 1,000 who actually has a serious cause of their symptom. Of all these doctors you're seeing, I don't see one for treating your mental health/anxiety. I guess if I were as confused as you appear to be, maybe I'd start from scratch..start with a mental health provider and a GP. A new one. Stop telling your doctors what your diagnosis is. Let the man or woman who went to medical school and has seen thousands of actual patients decide what tests you need and don't need. Youll eventually be treated for your mental health with proper treatment and/or medication. If you are diagnosed with an actual health issue you'll be treated for it. My head spins reading your post. How can you possibly know what's going on when you see 5 docs and diagnose yourself anyway.